blog_apr10

 

As I make the transition from indoor to beach volleyball, I was inspired to reflect on my career and how I got to where I am. There are many factors that contributed to my mindset and the evolution of my game – the most important being alchemizing failure to success.

This is an excerpt from my first book, Max Potential Playbook where I outline my personal process of development in reaching my max potential and how you can do the same in your life, no matter your profession, passion or personal story.

Download my book and get familiar with how your struggle can actually be your greatest gift.

Learning how to use failure as fuel for catalytic change and allowing it to run its course was not something that I always appreciated. As I look back on my career and attempt to identify the elements that contributed to my reaching my maximum potential, I would list them like this:

My process to reach maximum potential

  1. Be adaptive: ability to change
  2. Be objective: clarity leads to actual growth
  3. Be purposeful: on a mission: know where you are trying to go
  4. Be a team player: relationships, communication, protection
  5. Be process driven: hard work, pursuit of mastery, cultivate the will
  6. Be focused: “clutch”…a skill that is developed, not inherent
  7. Be a leader: Actions and Service
  8. Be present: immersed in the moment

As I learned how to respond to failure, it made me question if I had the right definition of what success was. What does it mean to be successful? How do I define it? Was it about trophies and championships, or are there bigger things at stake? Could success be more than an end result of a sporting match?

Success, the term and its significance in my life, became less about wins and more about development and pursuit of my personal maximum potential. Success became a process. I was achieving success if I was pushing my limits with every action, every rep, and every opportunity I was given. To achieve mastery and control over the skills, I would have to work hard. But that wasn’t all that needed to be developed. How I related, how I competed, how I handled pressure, and how I learned would all need to be addressed.

The first hurdle was to become a good learner. The tangible goal of winning matches and trophies would always be in sight and a goal worth pursuing, but it became glaringly clear that this journey was yielding benefits that would long outlive my playing career.

By | 2017-04-10T23:01:44+00:00 April 10th, 2017|Lifestyle|